Uncategorized, Coding, Azure

Friends don’t let friends commit Terraform without fmt, linting and validation

So it starts out easy, you write a bit of terraform and all is going well then as more and more people start committing and the code is churning things start to get messy. Breaking commits block release, formatting isn’t consistent and and errors get repeated.

Seems a bit odd right, in the middle of your devops pipe which dutifully checks code passes tests and validation you just give terraform a free pass.

Captain Picard Quotes. QuotesGram

The good new is terraform has tools to help you out here and make life better!

Here is my rough script for running during build to detect and fail early on a host of terraform errors. It’s also pinning terraform to a set release (hopefully the same one you use when releasing to prod) and doing a terraform init each time to make sure you have providers pinned (if not the script fail when a provider ships breaking changes and give you an early heads up).

It’s rough and ready so make sure your happy with what it does before you give it a run. For an added bonus the docker command below the script runs it inside a Azure Devops container to emulate locally what should happen when you push.

Optionally you can add args like -var java_functions_zip_file=something  to the terraform validate call.

Hope this helps as a quick rough guide!

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Coding

Terraform: Get Azure Function key

So you’ve deployed your function and you want to get pass the secure url another component in your deployment so it can use it…

Well currently there isn’t an output item on the azurerm_function_app resource in Terraform (I’m hoping to fix that up if I get some time) so how do you do it?

Here is a my quick and dirty fix using the azure_template_deployment resource in Terraform.

We create an empty release and then use the listkeys function to pull back the keys for the function. We only want the function key so we index into the object with functionKeys.default (you can get the master key too if you want).

Then we output this from the Terraform so it can be used elsewhere. You can now go ahead and pass this into your other component.

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Azure, How to, kubernetes

Kubernetes Integration Testing: MiniKube + Azure Pipelines = Happy

I recently did some work on a fairly simple controller to run inside Kubernetes. It connects to the K8s API and watches for changes to ingress objects in the cluster.

I had a nice cluster spun up for testing which I could tweak and poke then observe the results. This was nice BUT I wanted to translate it into something that ran as part of my CI process to make it more repeatable. Having not played much with the new Azure Pipelines I decided to try and get this working using one.

Here was the goal:

    • Build the source for the controller
    • Spin up a Kuberentes cluster
    • Deploy test resources (Ingress and Services) into the cluster
    • Connect the controller code to the cluster and run it’s tests

The obvious choice was to look at creating the clusters inside a cloud provider and using it for testing but I wanted each PR/Branch to be validated independently in a separate cluster, ideally in parallel, so things get complicated and expensive if we go down that route.

Instead I worked with MiniKube which has a ‘no vm mode’, this spins up a whole cluster using just docker containers. The theory was, if the CI supports running docker containers it should support MiniKube clusters…

TLDR: Yes this is possible with MiniKube and Azure Pipelines or Travis CI – Skip to the end to see how.

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